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the understanding of AMR (drug resistance) and one health

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A statistical information site that deepens the understanding of AMR (drug resistance) and one health

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Nakahama et al. conducted an awareness survey among clinicians regarding the administration of oral antimicrobials for the common cold syndrome.[26] The survey was conducted through internet research from January 6 to February 13, 2017. On-line questionnaire sheets were sent to physicians whom the research team knew, members of mailing lists of primary care physicians, members of university alumni associations, members of mailing lists of local medical associations, and so on. The responeded physicians were also able to distribute the questionnaire sheets to others. In total, 612 physicians responded to the questionnaire: 40% answered as self- employed physicians and 60% answered as employed physicians. Physicians in their 30's to 60's, actively seeing patients, accounted for the largest part of respondents, and male physicians accounted for 87%. By specialty, the share of internal medicine was the largest at 69%, followed by pediatrics at 16%, and by orthopedics and urology.

With respect to the administration of antimicrobials for the common cold syndrome, the most frequent response was "0 to less than 10% of patients with cold" at around 60%. As the reason for administering antimicrobials for the common cold syndrome, the most frequent response was "it is difficult to distinguish whether the cause is viral or bacterial" at more than 30%, followed by "patients' requests" at approximately 20%. As for response to patients' requests for antimicrobials, more than half of physicians prescribed antimicrobials when patients insisted on the need for antimicrobials despite patient education. The largest number of respondents, which acounted for about 30%, believed that priority in the antimicrobial resistance in the outpatient setting should be placed on enhanced public relation and awareness activities, targeting general public and clinicians.